Starbucks, citing environment, is ditching plastic straws

Starbucks unveils environment-friendly lid for cold drinks which puts straws on shelf

Starbucks unveils environment-friendly lid for cold drinks which puts straws on shelf

Starbucks said the new strawless lids will first be implemented in Seattle and Vancouver in the third quarter of this year.

Starbucks Coffee Co. estimates the switch will eliminate more than 1 billion plastic straws a year.

The company previously announced a $10 million effort to develop and introduce a "fully recyclable and compostable hot cup", according to the news release.

Straws made with alternative materials like paper and compostable plastic will be provided with Frappuccinos, as well as upon request by customers.

Starbucks will start rolling out strawless lids for all drinks in the fall.

Other cities, like Fort Meyers, have banned plastic straws as well.

McDonald's also said last month that it would replace plastic straws with paper ones in the United Kingdom and Ireland from September.


The announcement from McDonald's followed an April proposal by the United Kingdom government to ban plastic straws in the country.

The no-straw movement, which had already been brewing in certain communities and beach towns, gained mainstream traction three years ago after a video showing a sea turtle with a plastic straw wedged in its nose went viral.

A number of local governments have recently passed legislation restricting the use and distribution of plastic straws.

Starbucks, which doles out more than 1 billion straws a year, says it will phase out single-use plastic straws from its stores by 2020. Straws add up to only about 2,000 tons of the almost 9m tons of plastic waste that hits waters each year. "We hope others will follow in [Starbucks'] footsteps".

In a move meant to cut back on waste, the worldwide coffee giant said Monday that it would eliminate plastic straws from its more than 28,000 locations globally by 2020.

Nicholas Mallos, director of Ocean Conservancy's Trash Free Seas program, called Starbucks' decision a "shining example" of how companies can help fight ocean pollution.

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