New footage shows sedated football team carried from Thailand cave

Rescued schoolboys are moved from a Royal Thai Police helicopter to an ambulance

Rescued schoolboys are moved from a Royal Thai Police helicopter to an ambulance

A large rescue operation got under way on Sunday, with divers extracting the team in batches of four and five over the course of three days.

The rescue received blanket coverage in Thai media, with The Nation running the headline "Hooyah!"

Desperate attempts to free the trapped "Wild Boars" soccer team and their coach from a flooded Thai cave were hindered by wild weather and low oxygen.

The group remains in quarantine in Chiang Rai hospital, where one of the last batch of people to leave the cave has "minor pneumonia", he said.

The hospital treating 12 Thai school children rescued from a flooded cave has released the first video showing the boys since they were saved.

However, Prime Minister Prayuth Chan-ocha has said precautions would have to be implemented both inside and outside the cave to safeguard tourists. They will soon be able to meet them in person, but only while wearing protective clothing to reduce the risk of infection.

"The world just needs to know that what was accomplished was a once in a lifetime rescue", Anderson told The Associated Press in an interview today. The boys range in age from 11 to 16.

Nurses chatted with them and the boys responded with the customary Thai sign of respect - hands pressed together while bowing the head.

One of the American rescue specialists involved in the mission, Derek Anderson, 32, said the boys and their coach had been "incredibly resilient. and discussed staying strong, having the will to live, having the will to survive".


Even so, all need to be monitored in the hospital for seven days and then rest at home for another 30 days, he said.

The boys were in isolation in the hospital to prevent infections by outsiders.

Thai navy SEALs posted a almost six-minute video on their Facebook page that shows rescue workers pass along green stretchers in which the boys were being transported.

The extraordinary operation to save the boys came to an end on Tuesday, when the Thai Navy SEAL rescuers and a doctor followed the last four boys and their coach out of the cave complex. "The coach was the one to choose", he said. Lit by several beams of white light, the divers in wet suits and helmets are seen submerging themselves in the water and grabbing on to a metal dive line used to guide them through the winding channels of the six-mile cave.

Studio co-founder, Michael Scott, lives in Thailand and said his wife grew up with Saman Gunan, the former Thai Navy Seal member who lost his life during the mission.

Concerns are already being raised on social media that the movie could be "white-washed", focusing more on the worldwide characters while downplaying the role of Thais.

The second group of boys rescued has been given approval to see their parents through glass, but the third group are still undergoing tests, he said.

Rescue chief Narongsak Osottanakorn told reporters yesterday that the operation would not have been possible without the unique skills that Dr Harris brought to the mission, though he did not elaborate.

Police officers took photographs of each other at the massive cave entrance, as pumps continued to suck out huge volumes of water. They will likely be kept in the hospital for a week to undergo tests, officials said on Tuesday.

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