Facebook facing record £500000 fine over Cambridge Analytica scandal

Daniel Leal-olivas  AFP  Getty Images

Daniel Leal-olivas AFP Getty Images

Information Commissioner Elizabeth Denham said: "New technologies that use data analytics to micro-target people give campaign groups the ability to connect with individual voters".

Denham also called for the government to introduce a statutory code of practice for the use of personal data in political campaigns, adding that "this can not be at the expense of transparency, fairness and compliance with the law".

Facebook has said that a Cambridge University lecturer named Aleksandr Kogan collected the data legitimately through a personality quiz app but then violated Facebook's terms by sharing the information with Cambridge Analytica, a firm later hired by the Trump presidential campaign during the 2016 U.S. election.

Lawyers have lodged a mass complaint to Australian privacy authorities on behalf of Facebook users caught up in the Cambridge Analytica scandal.

Facebook, with CA, has been the focus of the ICO's investigation since February when evidence emerged that an app had been used to harvest the data of 50 million Facebook users around the world.

The probe "concluded that Facebook contravened the law by failing to safeguard people's information". The British agency said Facebook may have had a "missed opportunity" in 2014 to have thwarted Kogan's activities on the site.

The UK's data protection watchdog said the social media giant has failed to ensure Cambridge Analytica had deleted users' data.

Facebook faces a record fine of £500,000 from Britain's data watchdog for failing to protect users whose data was obtained by Cambridge Analytica.


"The scandal took place before new European Union data protection laws that allow much larger fines came into force", the broadcaster says. "We're reviewing the report and will respond to the ICO soon".

According to CNN, before 2015, in some cases when Facebook users interacted with the apps built by third-party developers on the social media platform, the developer not only got data about that user, but also about the users' friends and what they "liked".

"This can not by left to a secret internal investigation at Facebook".

'People can not have control over their own data if they don't know or understand how it is being used.

Mr Collins said his own committee will publish its interim report about disinformation and data use in political campaigns later this month.

It said it would work with Slattery Lawyers to investigate whether the claim for compensation was possible.

However, the Information Commissioner's report said other regulatory action would include a criminal prosecution against Cambridge Analytica's parent firm, SCL Elections, for failing to deal with the regulator's enforcement notice.

"The number of Facebook users affected by this kind of data scraping may be far greater than has now been acknowledged".

Recommended News

We are pleased to provide this opportunity to share information, experiences and observations about what's in the news.
Some of the comments may be reprinted elsewhere in the site or in the newspaper.
Thank you for taking the time to offer your thoughts.