New York AG Sues Trump Foundation - Cortney O'Brien

New York attorney general sues Trump and his children, alleging their charity engaged in 'persistent illegal conduct'

New York attorney general sues Trump and his children, alleging their charity engaged in 'persistent illegal conduct'

U.S. President Donald Trump smiles next to North Korean leader Kim Jong Un (not pictured) at the Capella Hotel on Sentosa island in Singapore June 12, 2018. Trump is returning from a vacation to Bedminster, N.J.

New York's attorney general announced on Thursday she was suing the Trump Foundation, as well as Donald Trump and his children, alleging "extensive and persistent" lawbreaking.

Underwood asserted in the suit, among other things, that the foundation "was little more than a checkbook for payments from Mr. Trump or his businesses to nonprofits, regardless of their goal or legality". "This is not how private foundations should function, and my office intends to hold the foundation and its directors accountable for its misuse of charitable assets".

New York's attorney general, Barbara Underwood, has begun a special proceeding to dissolve the Trump foundation under court supervision and obtain restitution of $2.8m (£2.1m) alongside additional penalties. Stay tuned for updates. "I won't settle this case!"The sleazy New York Democrats, and their now disgraced (and run out of town) A.G. Eric Schneiderman, are doing everything they can to sue me on a foundation that took in $18,800,000 and gave out to charity more money than it took in, $19,200,000".


"I won't settle this case!" he said. While such foundations are supposed to be devoted to charitable activities, the complaint asserts that Mr. Trump's was often used to curry political favor or settle legal claims against his various businesses, and even spent $10,000 on a portrait of Mr. Trump that was hung at one of his golf clubs.

Donald Trump hit back at the lawsuit on Twitter, saying that "sleazy NY democrats" were "doing everything they can to sue me on a foundation that took in $18,800,000 and gave out to charity more money than it took in, $19,200,000".

The purchase of the painting was an example of one of "at least five self-dealing transactions", the statement said, which violate tax regulations on non-profit charities. But those presidential powers couldn't be applied to state level prosecutions such as the one in NY.

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