'Net neutrality' ends; changes to internet service likely soon

Net neutrality ends this Monday June 11th motion to keep it alive could die in the House

Net neutrality ends this Monday June 11th motion to keep it alive could die in the House

Broadband companies have said that they will still continue to uphold the Net Neutrality principles but some Net Neutrality supporters say that it's not enough to just trust all the companies.

Trump-appointed FCC Chairman Ajit Pai, "a former Verizon lawyer, bucked the law, ignored public opinion and twisted the facts to make his ill-advised case for handing control of the internet to the anti-competitive cabal of giant phone and cable companies", as Free Press's Timothy Karr noted in an op-ed on Monday. The new rules, the Restoring Internet Freedom order approved by the FCC in December 2017, require ISPs to disclose any blocking, throttling or prioritization of their own content or from their partners.

The Federal Communications Commission voted to repeal net neutrality saying the regulations were unnecessary and unhelpful, that repeal takes effect Monday. "Consumers want an open Internet".


Net neutrality means that Internet providers have to treat everyone equally online. "Any Republican seeking re-election in the fall can't run from this polling data or from the people back home who demand real net neutrality". "Blocking, throttling, pay-for-priority fast lanes and other efforts to come between consumers and the Internet are now things of the past, "he said in 2015". "The internet is coming for net neutrality", said Greer.

Pai says he believes the net neutrality rules adopted during the Obama administration discourage internet providers from making investments in their network to provide better, faster online access. But far more realistically, we're probably going to see some gradual shifts in our service over time, especially since Comcast backed down on its good-faith promise the day the repeal passed and has previously limited access to peer-to-peer applications. In most circumstances, a bill does not reach the floor of the House of Representatives until voted out of the committee in which it was assigned.

The revised rules were a win for ISPs, whose practices faced significant government oversight and FCC investigations under the 2015 order. According to the National Council of State Legislatures, governors in six states - New Jersey, New York, Montana, Rhode Island, Vermont and Hawaii - have signed executive orders upholding net neutrality, and three - Washington, Vermont and OR - have enacted legislation that does so. Additionally, 22 states' and Washington DC's attorneys general have filed a lawsuit alongside almost a dozen other groups, challenging the FCC decision.

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