Ivanka Trump tweets ‘Chinese proverb’ that doesn’t actually exist

Ivanka Trump tweets 'Chinese' proverb, confusing China

Ivanka Trump tweets 'Chinese' proverb, confusing China

Donald Trump's daughter tweeted the pearl of wisdom just hours before the US president met with North Korean leader Kim Jong-Un, in Singapore.

Ms Trump, whose daughter is learning Mandarin, attributed the quote to "Chinese Proverb" along with her post on Twitter, published hours before her father came together with Mr Kim to seek an end to a tense decades-old nuclear stand-off.

Confucius says Ivanka Trump made a proverbial social media gaffe. However, users on China's largest Twitter-like microblogging site, Weibo, took to the social media platform to point out that such a proverb didn't actually exist in their language.

Quote Investigator, an internet website that looks at the origin of quotations, says the expression might have evolved from a comment in a periodical based in Chicago, Illinois, at the turn of the 20th century.

Ivanka's post appeared to be a jab at her father's critics as he prepared to meet Kim Jong Un in Singapore.

According to the New York Times, Ivanka Trump's tweet also sparked a widespread discussion on Weibo among baffled Chinese netizens who suggested genuine Chinese sayings which might convey a similar meaning to it.


Larry Herzberg, a professor of Chinese at Calvin College in MI, said Ivanka's tweet was "yet one more example of Americans ascribing a quote to the Chinese, often to Confucius, when they don't really know the origin of the saying".

'Our editor really can't think of exactly which proverb this is.

One person wrote: 'She saw it in a fortune cookie at Panda Express, ' while another added: 'It makes sense, but I still don't know which proverb it is'.

White House senior adviser Ivanka Trump arrives prior to a joint news conference between U.S. President Donald Trump an Japan's Prime Minister Shinzo Abe in the Rose Garden of the White House in Washington, U.S., June 7, 2018.

But her mysterious proverb was panned on Weibo.

Bill Kristol, editor of the USA political magazine the Weekly Standard, tweeted a guess that the phrase "seems in fact to be American from the turn of the 20th c. - which makes sense, since its spirit is can-do Americanism".

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