British PM avoids Brexit defeat in knife-edge parliament vote

GETTYMrs May will rally up her troops tonight for a powerful speech

GETTYMrs May will rally up her troops tonight for a powerful speech

After months of debating the detail of the legislation that will trigger United Kingdom withdrawal from the European Union, the House of Commons will stage crucial votes on Tuesday and Wednesday that will decide her fate.

British Prime Minister Theresa May narrowly avoided a major blow to her Brexit strategy Tuesday after MPs rejected a plan that would have given parliament a veto on the final deal negotiated with Brussels.

The Prime Minister appeared to have defused a potentially explosive row over the EU customs union on Monday night as Tory pro-Europe rebels Sir Oliver Letwin and Nicky Morgan and Brexiteers Jacob Rees-Mogg and Sir Bill Cash came together to table a separate compromise amendment backing "a customs arrangement" with the EU.

'They want us to deliver on Brexit and build a brighter future for Britain as we take back control of our money, our laws and our borders'. This particular amendment-backed by "rebel" members of May's Conservative party and some opposition lawmakers-would give lawmakers a greater spread of choices.

The SNP doesn't have any Lords because of an ideological disagreement with the concept of an unelected upper house - but it does have plenty of MPs in the Commons.

Ministers have conceded in principle to Tory rebels" demands for a "meaningful vote' on the eventual Brexit deal.

The Government has won the first votes during today's Brexit showdown.


The European Union Withdrawal Bill, meant to enact Britain's exit from the bloc, has had a rocky ride through Parliament.

A victory for the "meaningful final vote" amendment would leave the government weaker in am upcoming round of talks with European Union negotiators in late June, and also weaken Theresa May's authority as leader.

"If, in the future, I am to look my children in the eye and honestly say that I did my best for them I can not, in all good conscience, support how our country's current exit from the European Union looks set to be delivered", he said.

Earlier, Brexit minister David Davis told parliament a government defeat would undermine negotiations with Brussels and warned lawmakers the government would never allow them to "reverse Brexit". There were 14 of us in the room.

"However, facing the prospect of a humiliating defeat, Theresa May has been forced to enter negotiations with her backbenchers and offer a so-called concession". Lee, who voted for Britain to remain in the E.U.in the 2016 referendum, said in a statement he was "incredibly sad" to resign but did so in order to vote against the government's position on a key amendment to the bill.

"We will wait and see the details of this concession and will hold ministers to account to ensure it lives up to the promises they have made to Parliament".

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