WHO Calls for Global Ban on Trans Fat

WHO Calls for Worldwide Elimination of Trans Fats by 2023

WHO Calls for Worldwide Elimination of Trans Fats by 2023

The World Health Organization has reportedly introduced REPLACE - a step-by-step guide for annihilating industrially produced trans-fatty acids from the food supply chain. He further stated that implementing the six strategies in the REPLACE plan will help in eliminating the prevalence of trans-fat, thereby signifying a pivotal victory for WHO's initiative to combat cardiovascular ailments.

Food makers liked artificial trans fats because they prolong product shelf life and enhance flavor.

According to the World Health Organization experts, there are two main sources for trans fats: natural sources (in dairy products and meat of ruminants such as cows and sheep) and industrially-produced sources (partially hydrogenated oils). Health advocates say trans fats are the most harmful fat in the food supply. Hydrogenated fats are basically vegetable oil which has an extra hydrogen atom attached to its molecules using industrial processes, resulting in a substance that hardens into solid fat at lower temperatures, as the FDA described them.

According to the USDA, a reduction in trans fat could prevent almost 30,000 premature deaths in the USA every year.


A number of high income countries have already moved to restrict or ban trans-fats.

Denmark is the only country restrictions on trans fats. "But healthier alternatives can be used that would not affect taste or cost of food", The global health body said in the statement. "While we can not estimate a percentage of products on store shelves that will be free of PHOs on June 19, 2018, we are confident that over the past three years, manufacturers have taken appropriate steps to reformulate products if and as necessary", an FDA spokesperson told Newsweek.

Dr. Walter C. Willett, a professor of epidemiology and nutrition at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, said he thought the W.H.O. initiative would likely lead to the extinction of trans fats in the near future.

Yan Zong-hai (顏宗海), director of Chang Gung Memorial Hospital's Clinical Toxins Department, said that in addition to cardiovascular disease, global studies show that artificial trans fats can also cause obesity, as well as increasing the risk of fatty liver and Alzheimer's disease. Many dairy and meat products contain trans fats that have also been linked to heart disease. This is because they're used in partially-hydrogenated oils, which were first used as a butter replacement and then later as a replacement for foods containing saturated fatty acids. Diets high in trans fat increase heart disease risk by 21 per cent and deaths by 28 per cent.

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