Mark Zuckerberg meets with U.S. lawmakers following Facebook data breach scandal

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The senators' lack of understanding allowed Zuckerberg to evade important, unanswered questions about the extent of Facebook's data monitoring and why the company hasn't been more transparent with users how their data is used and how it's been abused.

The five-hour hearing saw senators launch questions ranging from censorship, freedom of speech and hate speech, consumer privacy to election interference. "How is today's apology different?"

He admitted "we have made a lot of mistakes" and "I'm sorry", adding: "I started Facebook when I was in college".

While many users may have the option to log off until they feel more comfortable with Facebook's privacy settings, Terri has a constant reminder that only continues to grow.

But the 33-year-old internet mogul managed to deflect any specific promises to support any congressional regulation of the world's largest social media network and other USA internet companies. Still, it is notable that Zuckerberg confirmed the company's cooperation with Mueller's team.

Although shaky at times, Zuckerberg seemed to gain confidence as the day progressed.

At times, he showed plenty of steel. Whenever he couldn't answer a question, he simply promised to get back to lawmakers later.

Under Diversity, he wrote, 'Silicon Valley has a problem and Facebook is part of that problem'.

He continued, "Senator, let me get clear on this, you're talking about this conspiracy theory that gets passed around that we listen to what's going on on your microphone and use that for ads".

Zuckerberg said it was "clearly a mistake" to believe the data-mining company had deleted user data it had harvested in an attempt to sway elections, AP reported.

"I am not sure whether there was a conversation about that", Zuckerberg said. He offered no details, citing a concern about confidentiality rules of the investigation.


Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg is expected to apologize once again for the social media giant's mishandling of personal data of tens of millions of users when he appears before a congressional committee on Tuesday.

"Facebook does not use your phone's microphone to inform ads or to change what you see in News Feed". Facebook also owns a VPN called Onavo - that it encourages users to install and which millions have - which monitors its users' internet traffic.

On Monday, Facebook began alerting people who had their data accessed two and half years after the incursion. That's where you'll find all the apps you've logged into using your Facebook page and what information they have access to.

The 33-year-old founder in the testimony accepted responsibility for the social network's failure to protect data of its users and manipulation of the platform that apparently helped Donald Trump occupy the Oval office in 2016.

Organizers said protests would take place in all three locations on Tuesday as Zuckerberg testifies in the House.

Sen. Lindsey Graham, R-S.C., asked Zuckerberg if he would be willing to work with lawmakers to examine what "regulations you think are necessary in your industry".

In a similar exchange, Sen. "I do think it mattered, just because it was information that was so detailed".

Facebook's chief operating officer, Sheryl Sandberg, said something similar to NBC last week: "We don't have an opt-out [of ads] at the highest level".

At the hearing, Zuckerberg said: "We didn't take a broad enough view of our responsibility, and that was a big mistake".

Even on the data privacy issue, senators pressed the CEO for an explanation of why users could trust Facebook, rather than what concrete steps could be taken to give users greater control over their data and how it's shared. Ortutay and Hamilton reported from NY.

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