Incidence of non-communicable diseases in India rose by 25 % since 1990

While lifestyle diseases such as cancer diabetes heart diseases and respiratory ailments have emerged as the scourge of relatively prosperous states malnutrition continues to plague the socioeconomically backward ones

While lifestyle diseases such as cancer diabetes heart diseases and respiratory ailments have emerged as the scourge of relatively prosperous states malnutrition continues to plague the socioeconomically backward ones

NCDs accounted for 37.9 percent deaths in 1990 and 61.8 percent deaths in 2016.

The under-five mortality rate has reduced substantially from 1990 in all states, the report said, adding that there was a four-fold difference in this rate between states.

According to the report, titled "India State-level Disease Burden" and released by Vice President M. Venkaiah Naidu here, indoor air pollution also caused five percent of the disease burden past year.

In 1990, 61% of the total disease burden in India was attributed to communicable, maternal, neonatal, and nutritional diseases.

Life expectancy at birth improved in India from 59.7 years in 1990 to 70.3 years in 2016 for females, and from 58.3 years to 66.9 years for males. The dominance is lower in Bihar, Jharkhand, Uttar Pradesh and Rajasthan.

The India State-level Disease Burden Initiative is a collaboration between the Indian Council of Medical Research, Public Health Foundation of India, and Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation at the University of Washington, and experts and stakeholders now from close to 100 institutions across India. However, there was an nearly two-fold difference in this disease burden rate among the states in 2016, with Assam, Uttar Pradesh, and Chhattisgarh having the highest rates, and Kerala and Goa the lowest rates.


"Many Indian states are bigger than most countries in the world". After child and maternal malnutrition, which was India's leading risk factor for health loss in 2016 causing 14.6 per cent of the country's total disability-adjusted life years (DALYs), air pollution was the second leading risk factor in India as a whole.

Among the 15-39 age group, 20.5 percent people in Telangana died due to suicide or violence, 13.5 percent died due to cardiovascular diseases and 10.4 percent due to road accidents.

This risk factor encompasses both outdoor air pollution from a variety of sources as well as household air pollution that mainly results from burning solid fuels for cooking and heat. "A comparison of the health parameters between 1990 and 2016 as depicted in the India Disease Burden report â€" demonstrates how the situation has changed on the ground. Kerala had the lowest burden due to this risk among the Indian states, but even this was 2.7 times higher per person than in China. He said, this report, along with the technical scientific paper and the open-access visualization tool that are also released today, together provide systematic insights in to the health status of each state and the health inequalities between the states of India. He suggested that generation of such comprehensive estimates for each district.

This knowledge base can be a crucial aid for more informed policy and interventions to improve population health in every state and union territory of India and in reducing health inequalities between the states.

Dr. K. Srinath Reddy, President of PHFI, pointed out that the contribution of non-communicable diseases to health loss had doubled in the past two decades.

Even though Delhi has now been facing a deteriorating quality of air due to pollution, it faces a marginally lower health risks, when compared to states like Bihar.

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